The Dick, Carey & Carey Instructional Design Model

This Instructional Design project was created using the Dick, Carey & Carey model. The project involved creating an online course for teaching Art History in parrallel with a Bible study. The resulting course is available at http://art.theseeker.org/.


Needs Assessment

Desired status: 12th graders who attend church need to know Christianity is not an isolated subject, but can span many disciplines (i.e.: engineering, mathematics, literature, science, health, history, art).

Actual status: Many young adults leave church after graduating from high school. 37% of those ages 18 to 29 who previously attended church quit attending (http://www.gallup.com/poll/6124/Religiosity-Cycle.aspx).

Reasons given for dropping out (http://www.christianpost.com/news/survey-reasons-why-young-adults-quit-church-28813/):

  • I simply wanted a break from church (27%)
  • Transitioning into college (25%)
  • Work responsibilities prevented me from attending (23%)
  • Too far away from the church to continue attending (22%)
These statistics are probably superficial excuses, where the deeper reason is more likely a faith that has yet to mature.

Need: By focusing the discipline of art history, students should see how the Bible can include other studies and give students a broader view, thus increasing their faith. All students should be able to pass a test (70%) that requires them to identify several periods of art history and to make a Biblical connection.

  • Needs Assessment Survey

    Purpose of Need

    Goal statement: The goal of this study is to develop a stronger faith in graduating seniors by studying the Bible in parallel with art history. Students should be able to recognize several periods of art history and make a Biblical reference to each.

  • Goal Analysis

    Problem: 12th graders need to broaden their scope of Biblical studies to include other applications.

    Solution: Help prepare high school seniors for this transition into adulthood. Assist them in cutting the Biblical cord of their parents' faith and developing their own faith. They are now at the level that they need apologetic evidences to firm up their faith. Bringing in supplemental studies, such as engineering, art, mathematics, biology, literature, history and art can help to reinforce their faith.

    Learning Context

    Why study the Bible in parallel with art history? Do they have anything in common? You may be surprised at the answers. Many times the Bible is studied in an isolated environment, and other resources concurrent with events in the Bible are not utilized.

    Much of the Bible is revealed in a chronological sequence that can be paralleled with the progress of art. By studying both art and the Bible we can gain a bigger appreciation and understanding of both. This study will also interject some science, math, mythology, and archeology.

    This study will be available as an eLearning course or can be taught in a classroom with an included Power Point presentation.

    Learner Analysis

    Entry Skills: The students should be able to locate Bible verses. It would benefit students to know the countries located around the Mediterranean Sea and the Middle East. Some basic world history such as what countries were in power would help. Students do not need to be artistic, but it would help to know about painting, sculpture and architecture.

    Prior Knowledge of Topic Area: None required.

    Attitudes toward Content and Potential Delivery System: Students may be skeptical about the subject and view this as a gimmick. It is important upfront to address this attitude. It may be that their parents are forcing them to take this class. It is essential to grab their interest at the beginning.

    Academic Motivation: It is key to grab the students' attention and make the study relevant to them. Testing will only be conducted as a self check.

    Educational and Ability Levels: As high school students, they should be able to navigate easily through the course.

    General Learning Preferences: The majority of students' personal learning style would be very open to eLearning. Some may prefer it over lecture. Some adults taking this course may wish to teach it in a lecture format. A PowerPoint presentation will be included for that purpose.

    Attitudes toward Training Organization: The study will most likely be presented to students by a youth minister or church leader. Their attitude towards that person may taint their perspective of this course.

    Group Characteristics: The target is primarily high school seniors from a church background; however, it can be used for other ages. It is probably too advanced for those below the ninth grade. The target audience maybe questioning everything they were told in the past and looking for a new perspective. This is the group that is the challenge for this study.

    Objectives

    Goal: High school graduating seniors will learn the Bible in parallel with art history.

    Instructional Objective 1: Students will be able to discuss how they were created to be creative, using Biblical references.

      Terminal Objective:
      • Identify from the creation story, what it means when it says "God created man in his own image."

    Instructional Objective 2: Students will be able to define aesthetics, and how it is a divine attribute.

      Terminal Objectives:
      • Explain from the creation story, what it means when it says "God saw it was good," then later, Eve saw the fruit as "pleasing to the eye."
      • Define aesthetics.

    Instructional Objective 3: Students will be able to identify periods of art from Prehistoric Art to Gothic Art and make Biblical associations.

      Terminal Objectives:
      • Relate Prehistoric art to Noah and the flood.
      • Relate Mesopotamian Art with Abraham.
      • Relate Egyptian Art with Moses.
      • Relate Cretan Art with the apostle Paul.
      • Relate Greek Art with Daniel and later Paul.
      • Relate sculpture with idolatry.
      • Relate Roman Art with Jesus and His apostles.
      • Identify the primary supporting structures.
      • Relate Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic Art with the early church.

    Assessments

    Assessments are included in the course. Each assessment question has been aligned with the course objectives. They are not displayed here in order to maintain the integrity of the instruction.

    Instructional Strategy

    Goal: High school graduating seniors will learn the Bible in parallel with art history.

    Preinstructional Activities
    Motivating Learners:

      Why study the Bible in parallel with art history? Do they have anything in common? You may be surprised at the answers. Many times we study the Bible in an isolated environment, and we don't utilize the other resources concurrent with events in the Bible. Occasionally, a reference to Josephus may be used, but what about others?

    Informing the Learner of the Objectives:

      Much of the Bible is revealed in sequence with the progress of art. By studying both art and the Bible we can gain a bigger appreciation and understanding of both. This study also interjects some science, math, mythology, and archeology. At the end of this study you should be able to recognize several periods of art history and make a Biblical reference to each. When you complete this study, you should be able to:
      1. Discuss how you were created to be creative, using Biblical references.
      2. Define aesthetics, and how it is a divine attribute.
      3. Identify periods of art from Prehistoric Art to Gothic Art and make Biblical associations.

    Stimulating Recall of Prerequisite Skills:

      In this study, you will utilize your Bible knowledge, some knowledge of the Mediterranean region and world history, and basic art knowledge (painting, sculpture, architecture, color, shapes, etc.).

    Objective 1: Students will be able to discuss how they were created to be creative, using Biblical references.

      Content Presentation and Learning Guidance
      • Genesis 1 - Focus on God as the Creator.
      • Genesis 1:27 - What does it mean, "God created man in his own image?" How is man different from animals?
      • Isaiah 45:7-12 - God compares Himself to an artist.

      Learner Participation
      • Student text input: What does it mean, "God created man in his own image?"

    Objective 2: Students will be able to define aesthetics, and how it is a divine attribute.

      Content Presentation and Learning Guidance
      • Define aesthetics.
      • Genesis 1 - Focus on how "it was good" is used.
      • Genesis 3:1, 6 - How Satan used aesthetics to tempt Eve.

      Learner Participation

      • Student text input: How did aesthetics last influence your decision?

    Objective 3: Students will be able to identify periods of art from Prehistoric Art to Gothic Art and make Biblical associations.

      Content Presentation and Learning Guidance
      Provide a timeline for periods of art. How did they influence each other? How were the Jews influenced by them?
      Prehistoric Art:
      • Caves for housing (Genesis 19:30; Judges 6:2;15:8,11)
      • Caves for hiding (1 Kings 18:13; 1 Samuel 24; Joshua 10:16-18,22-23,26-27)
      • Caves for tombs (Genesis 23;25:9;49:29ff; John 11)
      • Make a connection between the cave paintings of France with Noah and the ark (Genesis 7:14-15).
      Mesopotamian Art:
      • Ziggurats and the Tower of Babel (Genesis 11:1-9; Jeremiah 17:5-8)
      • Ziggurats, Nimrod and the Epic of Gilgamesh (Genesis 10:9-10)
      • Ur-Nammu Ziggurat and the Call of Abram (Genesis 11:27-31)
      • Cuneiforms to record history.
      • Mesopotamian Gods (Joshua 24:15; Judges 16:23; Isaiah 34:14; Jeremiah 50:2; 2 Kings 17:30)
      • The King's Highway (Genesis 37:28)
      Egyptian Art:
      • Step Pyramid of Djoser
      • Pyramid of Snefru (Bent Pyramid) at Dahshur
      • The Great Pyramids
      • The Pharaohs (Genesis 12:10-20;16:1; 1 Kings 11:40; 2 Chronicles 12:2;35:20-22; 36:3-4; 2 Kings 19:9; Isaiah 37:9; 2 Kings 23:29-35; Jeremiah 44:30;46:2)
      • Egyptian mythology and the ten plagues
      • Paintings
      Cretan Art:
      • A matriarchal religion and the bull
      • Palace of King Minos (Acts 27; Titus 1:5;2:5,12)
      • Plumbing and drainage
      Greek Art:
      • King Nebuchadnezzar's dream and sculpture mediums (Daniel 2; 1 Peter 2:4,7)
      • Timeline of art and Biblical events (Galatians 4:1-7; Ephesians 1:3-14; 2 Peter 3:3-10)
      • Doric, Ionic and Corinthian architecture
      • Paul in Corinth (Acts 18:1-18; 1 Corinthians 10:14-22)
      • Paul and Athens Acropolis (Acts 17)
      • Is it sculpture or idolatry? Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic (1 Corinthians 8:4-13)
      Roman Art:
      • Building on the Greeks
      • Mythology (Acts 14:11-15;19;28:5-6), Hades & Lucifer (Ecclesiastes 12:3; Matt 11:23;16:18; Luke 10:15;16:23; Acts 2:27,31; Rev 1:18;6:8;20:13-14), compare Greek gods with Roman gods.
      • The Caesars (Luke 2:1;3:1; Mark 12:16-17; Acts 18:2;22; Philippians 4:22; Revelation 1:2-3)
      • Architectural structures: post & beam, barrel vault, groin vault, dome (Psalm 118:22-24; Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10; Luke 20:17; Acts 4:11)
      • The Colosseum and the prison epistles (Acts 23:11; Philippians 1:12-14; 1 Corinthians 4:9)
      Christian Art:
      • Byzantine Art and the origins of church buildings (2 Corinthians 4:4; Colossians 1:15; 3:10; Acts 7:44-50; 1 Corinthians 3:9-17)
      • Romanesque Art depicting Biblical subjects (Matthew 6:5-6,16-21,28-29)
      • Gothic Art and the Catholic Church (John 4:20-24)
      • Catholic saints (Romans 8:26-27,34; Hebrews 7:25
      • Signs and symbols of Renaissance Art (Matthew 5:13)

      Learner Participation
      • Students can type in their name and see it in Egyptian hieroglyphics.
      • Provide students with a Golden Ratio calculator.
      • Interactive aerial map of Acropolis and the Areopagus.

    Assessment
    Posttest

    Follow-Through Activities
    Provide a list of web sites for additional research into Art History.

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